Last week, City of Miami Commissioners agreed to allow voters to consider a $400 million dollar bond measure that would not only provide climate planning and resiliency efforts in low-income communities, but also potentially add 100 million dollars for affordable housing.

The 3-2 vote came hours after residents and housing advocates from Little Havana, Overtown, Liberty City and Hialeah rallied outside the offices of the Mill Creek –Modera Riverhouse development (1170 NW 11th Street, Miami, Florida 33136) to call for more action on making housing more affordable. 

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It was just one of several events organized around the nation as part of the National Housing Week of Action. Local organizations involved with the rally included the Miami Dade Branch NAACP, the Miami Workers Center (MWC), the New Florida Majority (NewFM), Fanm Ayisyen nan Miyami/Haitian Women of Miami (FANM), Struggle for Miami’s Affordable and Sustainable Housing (SMASH), and the Community Justice Project (CJP).

“We’re here today to raise awareness about the need for more affordable housing now,” said the NAACP’s Daniela Pierre. “Many residents have contacted the Miami-Dade branch NAACP and other community partners to raise concerns of being priced out of South Florida.”

ONE STEP FORWARD, MORE VICTORIES NEEDED

After rallying outside the offices of the new development, half of the advocates journeyed to Miami City Hall, where a city planning committee and the entire commission were considering several housing-related items.

Other advocates journeyed closer to the local meeting of the Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board. There, they urged developers and community representatives to offer more practical solutions to a crisis that is threatening to not just reshape Miami-Dade, but throw long-time residents and families into the street.

It was just the latest in a series of actions this summer by local residents that is helping to push the cause of affordability forward. As the curtain begins to rise on the county’s budget process this September, residents know that more actions are needed to help stem a crisis that is worrying civic and business leaders alike. 

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