Dec 03, 2010 —

Gihan Perera, Executive Director of Florida New Majority, was featured in a Miami Herald article today about unemployment in Florida. Over 100,000 unemployed Floridians will run out of their benefits this week with no opportunity to reinstate them unless Congress approves of more federal extensions.

As Gihan puts it: “This is class warfare. Middle class and working people are being held hostage.”With their only lifeline cut off, Floridians will have nowhere to turn, and no form of steady income to afford bare essentials needed to survive. Please read the article and share it with your loved ones.

If you know anyone who is collecting unemployment benefits who would like to share their story with us, please contact Jessica Somerhausen at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

An advocacy group for the unemployed warned that nearly two million Americans will soon be without jobless benefits.

BY MARCIA HEROUX POUNDS

SUN SENTINEL

With two million Americans poised to lose jobless benefits starting this week, the Obama administration is pushing Congress to pair an extension of unemployment aid with a deal to also extend the Bush-era tax cuts.

Because the aid program lapsed Tuesday, more than 107,500 unemployed workers in Florida are losing their jobless benefits, according to National Employment Law Project, an advocacy group for the unemployed.

Nearly two million unemployed Americans will run out of benefits over the holidays, the group said.

Now, Floridians who lose their jobs will only be able to access 26 weeks of regular state unemployment benefits.

During the recession, up to 79 weeks of federal emergency benefits have been available to many unemployed workers in the state.

The group being cut off from benefits includes nearly 34,000 Floridians who have only had six months of regular unemployment compensation.

Activist Gihan Perera heads a Miami group that pushes for extended unemployment benefits. His organization, Florida New Majority, works with unemployed residents who depend on the weekly checks — capped at $300 in Florida — to keep their homes intact, he said.